The Forgotten Codex

airyairyquitecontrary:

aconnormanning:

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.
PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

These are some fun fucking facts

You know, a pink living room doesn’t even seem out of character for the Addamses. They liked their whimsy.

airyairyquitecontrary:

aconnormanning:

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.

PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

These are some fun fucking facts

You know, a pink living room doesn’t even seem out of character for the Addamses. They liked their whimsy.

(Source: stupidimagesforcraziestpeople, via historicaltrek)

Okay, okay, I’m going to tell you what Hermione sees in Ron.

A trio is a balancing act, right? They’re equalizers of each other. Harry’s like the action, Hermione’s the brains, Ron’s the heart. Hermione has been assassinated in these movies, and I mean that genuinely—by giving her every single positive character trait that Ron has, they have assassinated her character in the movies. She’s been harmed by being made to be less human, because everything good Ron has, she’s been given.

So, for instance: “If you want to kill Harry, you’re going to have to kill me too”—RON, leg is broken, he’s in pain, gets up and stands in front of Harry and says this. Who gets that line in the movie? Hermione.

“Fear of a name increases the fear of the thing itself.” Hermione doesn’t say Voldemort’s name until well into the books—that’s Dumbledore’s line. When does Hermione say it in the movies? Beginning of Movie 2.

When the Devil’s Snare is curling itself around everybody, Hermione panics, and Ron is the one who keeps his head and says “Are you a witch or not?” In the movie, everybody else panics and Hermione keeps her head and does the biggest, brightest flare of sunlight spell there ever was.

So, Hermione—all her flaws were shaved away in the films. And that sounds like you’re making a kick-ass, amazing character, and what you’re doing is dehumanizing her. And it pisses me off. It really does.

In the books, they balance each other out, because where Hermione gets frazzled and maybe her rationality overtakes some of her instinct, Ron has that to back it up; Ron has a kind of emotional grounding that can keep Hermione’s hyper-rationalness in check. Sometimes Hermione’s super-logical nature grates Harry and bothers him, and isn’t the thing he needs even if it’s the right thing, like when she says “You have a saving people thing.” That is the thing that Harry needed to hear, she’s a hundred percent right, but the way she does it is wrong. That’s the classic “she’s super logical, she’s super brilliant, but she doesn’t know how to handle people emotionally,” at least Harry.

So in the books they are this balanced group, and in the movies, in the movies—hell, not even Harry is good enough for Hermione in the movies. No one’s good enough for Hermione in the movies—God isn’t good enough for Hermione in the movies! Hermione is everybody’s everything in the movies.

Harry’s idea to jump on the dragon in the books, who gets it in the movies? Hermione, who hates to fly. Hermione, who overcomes her withering fear of flying to take over Harry’s big idea to get out of the—like, why does Hermione get all these moments?

[John: Because we need to market the movie to girls.]

I think girls like the books, period. And like the Hermione in the books, and like the Hermione in the books just fine before Hollywood made her idealized and perfect. And if they would have trusted that, they would have been just fine.

Would the movies have been bad if she was as awesome as she was in the books, and as human as she was in the books? Would the movies get worse?

She IS a strong girl character. This is the thing that pisses me off. They are equating “strong” with superhuman. To me, the Hermione in the book is twelve times stronger than the completely unreachable ideal of Hermione in the movies. Give me the Hermione in the book who’s human and has flaws any single day of the week.

Here’s a classic example: When Snape in the first book yells at Hermione for being an insufferable know-it-all, do you want to know what Ron says in the book? “Well, you’re asking the questions, and she has to answer. Why ask if you don’t want to be told?” What does he say in the movie? “He’s got a point, you know.” Ron? Would never do that. Would NEVER do that, even before he liked Hermione. Ron would never do that.

— Melissa Anelli THROWS IT DOWN about the way Ron and Hermione have been adapted in the movies on the latest episode of PotterCast. Listen here. This glorious rant starts at about 49:00. (via karakamos)

(via allyouneedarecats)

“Romeo can’t really be blamed for Ophelia’s death.”

Senior English major on a Shakespeare final. (via minininny)

WELL THEY’RE NOT WRONG

——

How about this, though?

image

[Editorial Note: This “theory” depends on believing the Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet take place contemporaneously. So, for the sake of argument, let’s all agree that the events of both plays occur in the Spring of 1517 (chosen because of Martin Luther’s 95 Theses, and the Reformational threads that run through Hamlet).]

See, in the Second Quarto and First Folio versions of Romeo and Juliet, a[n extremely minor] character appears with Romeo, Mercutio, and Benvolio at the Capulet’s Party (where, if you recall, Romeo meets Juliet for the first time).

Like Hamlet's Horatio, this Horatio is full of well-worded philosophical advice. He tells Romeo “And to sink in it should you burden love, too great oppression for a tender thing.”

image

Fig. 1 - Second Quarto Printing

image

Fig. 2 - First Folio Printing

[The American Shakespeare Center’s Education Blog discusses the likely “real” reasons for Horatio’s presence]

Let’s imagine that Horatio has travelled down from Wittenberg (about 540 miles) to Verona for his Spring Break. He hears about some guys who like to party (because, let’s be honest, besides getting stabbed, partying is Mercutio’s main thing). So, he ends up crashing the Capulet’s ball with them.

He is then on the sidelines as Romeo and Juliet fall in love, Tybalt kills Mercutio, Romeo kills Tybalt, Romeo gets banished, and both lovers are found dead in Juliet’s tomb.

This tragedy fresh in his mind, he returns to Wittenberg at the end of what has turned out to be a decidedly un-radical Spring Break and discovers that his bestie Prince Hamlet is leaving for Elsinore Castle because he’s just gotten news that his father, the King, is dead.

On the trip up (another ~375 miles), Horatio recounts the tragic romance he just witnessed in Verona. He advises (as he is wont to do) Hamlet not to mix love and revenge.

Hamlet takes Horatio’s advice to heart, breaking up with Ophelia so that he can focus is energy on discovering and punishing his father’s killer:

HAMLET
Ay, truly; for the power of beauty will sooner
transform honesty from what it is to a bawd than the
force of honesty can translate beauty into his
likeness: this was sometime a paradox, but now the
time gives it proof. I did love you once.

OPHELIA

Indeed, my lord, you made me believe so.

HAMLET

You should not have believed me; for virtue cannot
so inoculate our old stock but we shall relish of it: I loved you not.

Ophelia - burdened by the perceived loss of Hamlet’s love and his murder of her father - goes mad and drowns herself.

You see, if Romeo had waited literally a minute and thirty seconds longer (31 iambic pentametrical lines) - he, Juliet, Ophelia (and possibly the rest of the Hamlet characters) would have made it.

* With thanks to roguebelle.

(via thefeminineending)

Buncha fuckin nerds in this town.

(via moriartini)

The Hamratiophelia Conspiracy Theory ftw

(via zahnie)

(Source: cherries-jubilee, via atopfourthwall)

atopfourthwall:

actual-human-girl:

super-who-locked-in:

titenoute:

moose-on-the-loose:

what is this show even about

shhh it’s just the best medical show in the world

apparently its actually the most accurate medical show???

^ true facts. I found that out when my best friend was studying to become a paramedic. It was the only show all the paramedics watched and weren’t annoyed by constant medical mistakes/wrong procedures/wrong displays etc.

There’s an episode where Dick Van Dyke plays the nicest guy in the hospital whom everybody loves… buuuut he’s old and completely out of date on medical procedures and the perennial “villain” of the show (and also his best friend), Dr. Kelso, has to fire him for the very basic reason that medical procedures and technology are updating and changing every year and not keeping up to date with them means people will die and lawsuits will happen.

What has two thumbs and knows Scrubs was an awesome show?

Bob Kelso.

(Source: tacoposey)

invadermak said: In the interview with Ashe, you mentioned the possibility that you could have romances with Inquisition characters and turn down sex with them. I know a bunch of asexual fans were pretty hopeful about that possibility (myself included). Is there any way you can clarify that statement without spoiling anything? What exactly does it mean to continue a romance but turn down the LI when it comes to sex? Will the romance scenes be the same otherwise? Thanks!

dgaider:

Not all the DAI romance arcs culminate in a “sex scene”, and I can recall at least one where the conversation which would otherwise lead into such a scene need not (at the player’s discretion) and the romance arc continues on. I wouldn’t call it a feature, per se, as it’s not consistently applied, and is just something I encouraged the writers to try.

I’m not sure if that counts as asexual representation, but if it amounts to the same thing then that’s great. It’s something you’ll probably see us doing more of in the future—not specifically for asexual fans, but because I’ve always been of the opinion that romance arcs need not always revolve around sex. It’s not the be-all and end-all of what romance is truly about.

akimiya:

I am a nightmare (2014) / 9pg / Akimiya Jun (tumblr)

Thank you for reading!  

(via ostanasky)

blackjackkent:

One of the worst parts of this war is watching the kids react. If they’re lucky, they grow up thinking the galaxy is basically a decent place. Some rough spots here and there, but for the most part, life makes sense.

Now they find out it was all a lie. They wake up to see these things in the dark that just want to destroy everyone they ever cared about.

If they survive, there will be a lot of angry orphans out there looking for answers…

~ Garrus Vakarian

(via fuckyeahbioware)

almost-tumbir-famous:

iloominations:

reserve:

"You lie and kill in the service of liars and killers," Loki tells Natasha, and he turns out to be totally fucking right about that.

Because SHIELD is Hydra. Well played, Loki. Well played.

image

do you sometimes wonder if marvel planned it all or just hopes it works out

(via historicaltrek)

vilify:

Third picture in a series of my favorite video game ladies - Darth Revan.
Darth Revan is an unusual selection for this list I guess because Revan isn’t canonically female - whatever that means though. Because lbr Star Wars canon also includes shit like midicholorians and the Yuuzhan Vong.
But really Darth Revan is what this list is all about: Meaningful representation.
KOTOR SPOILERS IN THIS BIT HERE LOOK AWAY IF YOU DON’T WANT THEM~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The first time I played KOTOR I didn’t actually realize the big spoiler until it got there.  Silly of me I  guess but playing as a female character made all the difference - I didn’t expect to see this powerful,  rebellious Jedi war hero-turned-Sith Lord be anything but a man under the mask. Revan is a leader, a  firebrand, and quite possibly a monster. I never considered that my player character could be Revan, because Revan was a number of things that are typically coded as male, and I was playing a woman.
That’s what this list is about, honestly. It’s about the fact that as a woman, I want to play video games that give me the same thing men get from games. I want heroes and villains and everything in between, I want  strong and weak and dangerous and wrong and right and beautiful and noble and flawed characters and I want them to be someone I can see myself in. As a gamer, you aren’t simply watching a story take place, you are  enforcing and creating the story with every action you take. Given this, how can representation ever be construed as something inessential or petty? Empathy and agency are at the core of gaming as a medium, and forgetting this or failing to apply it to half of gamers is just dumb as hell.

vilify:

Third picture in a series of my favorite video game ladies - Darth Revan.

Darth Revan is an unusual selection for this list I guess because Revan isn’t canonically female - whatever that means though. Because lbr Star Wars canon also includes shit like midicholorians and the Yuuzhan Vong.

But really Darth Revan is what this list is all about: Meaningful representation.

KOTOR SPOILERS IN THIS BIT HERE LOOK AWAY IF YOU DON’T WANT THEM~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The first time I played KOTOR I didn’t actually realize the big spoiler until it got there.  Silly of me I  guess but playing as a female character made all the difference - I didn’t expect to see this powerful,  rebellious Jedi war hero-turned-Sith Lord be anything but a man under the mask. Revan is a leader, a  firebrand, and quite possibly a monster. I never considered that my player character could be Revan, because Revan was a number of things that are typically coded as male, and I was playing a woman.

That’s what this list is about, honestly. It’s about the fact that as a woman, I want to play video games that give me the same thing men get from games. I want heroes and villains and everything in between, I want  strong and weak and dangerous and wrong and right and beautiful and noble and flawed characters and I want them to be someone I can see myself in. As a gamer, you aren’t simply watching a story take place, you are  enforcing and creating the story with every action you take. Given this, how can representation ever be construed as something inessential or petty? Empathy and agency are at the core of gaming as a medium, and forgetting this or failing to apply it to half of gamers is just dumb as hell.

(via fuckyeahbioware)